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Management of giant papillary conjunctivitis

CL-associated Papillary Conjunctivitis (CLAPC), Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC) The CMGs are guidelines on the diagnosis and management of a range of common and rare, but important, eye conditions that present with varying frequency in primary and first contact care An overview of giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) secondary to the wearing of contact lenses, as well as a systematic clinical approach for the control and treatment of this disorder are discussed. This clinical approach has proven to be extremely successful Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Management: Remove offending agents such as stopping contact lens wear, changing lens solutions or suture removal. Encourage the patients to replace lenses frequently, use preservative-free lens solution, and increase lens hygiene Combination mast cell stabilizers/antihistamines and modification of contact lens type/hygiene are the primary treatments for giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). Topical steroids can be used in..

CL-associated Papillary Conjunctivitis (CLAPC), Giant

  1. Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an allergic reaction of the eye. It occurs when one or several small round bumps (papillae) develop on the underside of the eyelid
  2. In giant papillary conjunctivitis, large bumps appear on the underside of the eyelid. GPC Causes . GPC seems to be caused by the following: An allergy, either to contact lenses or the chemicals used to clean them. Contact lens wearers with asthma, hay fever, or other allergies are more likely to get GPC
  3. The Loteprednol Etabonate Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Study Group I. Am J Ophthalmol 1997 Apr;123(4):455-64. 18. Asbell P, Howes J. A double-masked, placebo-controlled evaluation of the efficacy and safety of loteprednol etabonate in the treatment of giant papillary conjunctivitis. CLAO J 1997 Jan;23(1):31-6. 19
  4. Pharmacologic Management of Allergic Conjunctivitis: An Evidence-Based Algorithm 4 dust mites, mold spores, or animal dander—and do not follow a seasonal distribution.1 As a re- sult, perennial allergies are problematic for pa
  5. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis The most important management in GPC is modifying the causative entity. This generally includes removal or replacement of sutures, rotating the knots, or using a therapeutic contact lens
  6. The term giant papillary conjunctivitis is a long name for a few types of allergic reactions that affect the eyelids. (There are three types of GPC: two types of primary GPC and one secondary type, which is the most common form in the Western world. (Symptoms and causes of each type of GPC are very similar
  7. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is the second most com-monly encountered allergic eye disease in clinical practice. It is named because of very obvious and impressive clinical appear-ance. Essentially, large papillae form on the superior tarsal plate. It is accompanied with itching and redness along with a

Primary Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis. Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis VKC is a chronic allergic conjunctivitis affecting children and young adults, generally between the ages of 6 and 18. Patients often have concurrent allergic diseases such as seasonal allergies and asthma First described by Australian ophthal­mologist Thomas Spring, MD, in 1974, giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an exogenous ocular inflammatory condition commonly seen in contact lens wearers and patients with ocular prosthesis or exposed sutures following surgery. 1 Often mislabeled as an environmental allergic reaction, GPC is in fact the result of papillary changes in the tarsal.

Giant papillary conjunctivitis, though categorized as allergic ocular disease, really is a reaction to irritation. Knowing this aids diagnosis and management. Terry Chin, O.D Giant papillary conjunctivitis or GPC, a relatively new illness, is an inflammatory, non-contagious condition targeting the conjunctiva - the membrane lining the structures of the eye, including the eyelids.The papillae or the glands in the upper lid become larger than normal, causing itch and mucus discharge Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Management in Hydrogel Contact Lens Wearers Joseph F. Molinari, OD, MEd, FAAO Joseph Molinari is assistant Professor of Optometry at the School of Optometry, University of Alabama, USA. Introduction Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is thought to be a cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity with a possible. Giant (mechanically induced) Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC), the severe form of mechanically induced papillary conjunctivitis, may be secondary to a variety of mechanical stimuli of the tarsal conjunctiva. Since GPC is predominantly associated with the use of contact lenses (CLs), the disease is also referred to as contact lens-induced papillary conjunctivitis (CLPC)

Clinical management and control of giant papillary

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Columbia Ophthalmolog

  1. ‌Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) causes swelling, redness, and irritation in the lining of the membrane inside your eyelids. Contact lens wearers have the highest risk of developing GPC
  2. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis: First item of management is to remove the mechanical irritant, which is most commonly a contact lens. Patients should be educated and begin the same general allergic eye care used in other subtypes of ocular allergy (avoid rubbing eyes, use artificial tears and cool compresses, avoid allergen exposure)
  3. Elhers W, Donshik P. Giant papillary conjunctivitis. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008;8(5):445-9. Knop E, Knop N. Anatomy and immunology of the ocular surface. Chem Immunol Allergy. 2007;92:36-49. Knop E, Knop N. Influence of the eye-associated lymphoid tissue (EALT) on inflammatory ocular surface disease. Ocul Surf. 2005;3(4 Suppl):S180-6

Giant or contact lens papillary conjunctivitis is characterised by the symptoms of itching, stringy discharge and contact lens intolerance. Signs include the presence of small to large papillae and redness on the upper palpebral conjunctiva ( Fig. 17.10 ) ( Skotnitsky et al. 2002 ) Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Management. The aim of Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis management is to reduce the symptoms resulting from the condition. Topical supportive therapies help flush away allergens and other wastes and helps decrease the effect of the disease. Refresh Plus, Bion Tears and Dry Eye Therapy may help achieve Giant.

In contrast, papillary reactions are nonspecific and can be seen in a variety of conditions including chronic blepharitis, allergic and bacterial conjunctivitis, and contact lens wear. Papillary reactions appear as a fine mosaic-like pattern of ele-vated polygonal hyperaemic areas often described as being like cobblestones (see Figure 2) All of the four allergic conjunctivitis subtypes, except for giant papillary conjunctivitis, should start their management with topical lubricants, anti-histamines, and mast cell stabilizer drops. Giant papillary conjunctivitis necessitates the removal of the physical allergen, such as contact lenses, before proceeding with th Start studying Management of conjunctivitis. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. atopic keratoconjunctivitis and giant papillary conjunctivitis. Cause of seasonal allergic conjunctivitis diffuse papillary hypertrophy and keratopahy, trantas dots. Most serious manifestation of vernal. e. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Most often associated with soft contact lens wear, giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) has been reported in patients wearing soft, hard, and rigid gas-permeable contact lenses, as well as in patients with ocular prostheses or exposed sutures in contact with the conjunctiva.7,8 2. Bacterial Conjunctivitis • Giant papillary conjunctivitis. In 1974, research found a papillary reaction on the upper tarsal conjunctiva in soft contact lenses wearers that closely resembled lid changes seen in ocular allergy. 2 We now refer to this condition as giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) or contact lens-induced papillary conjunctivitis

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Treatment & Management

  1. The most effective, easiest treatment of giant papillary conjunctivitis is simply to discontinue contact lens wear. Of course, many contact lens wearers find this an unacceptable solution. If the eyes are given an opportunity to recover, contact lens wear may be possible at a later time. However, even after a break, the problem may recur when.
  2. Giant papillary conjunctivitis Bacterial conjunctivitis Viral conjunctivitis Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis management of the allergic conjunctivitis. The patient was to return to the office in one year for their next comprehensive eye exam, or sooner if needed
  3. ABSTRACT The successful clinical management of a patient with giant papillary conjunctivitis is reported. The patient was a 50 year old man. Case Report: A Procedure for the Clinical Management of Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis in a Patient Wearing Contact Lenses - MOLINARI - 1980 - The Australian Journal of Optometry - Wiley Online Librar
  4. Management of giant papillary conjunctivitis. The treatment for giant papillary conjunctivitis due to the use of contact lenses generally involves not wearing them for several days or weeks. The doctor might suggest using a different cleaning, wetting or soaking solution. There are changes in the lens-care regimen to lessen the buildup of.
  5. e your eyes and possibly collect a sample on a swab.
  6. Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is characterized by the presence of giant papillae on the superior tarsal conjunctiva that can be visualized upon eyelid eversion. 1 Although the pathophysiology is not well understood, it is believed to be a result of an immunologic process that results from foreign bodies such as contact lenses, exposed sutures, ocular prosthetics, and filtering blebs
  7. e release from mast cells and inhibition of local inflammation. Topical corticosteroids, mast cell stabilizers, hista

Additional differential diagnoses to consider depending on history and physical would be seasonal allergic conjunctivitis and giant papillary conjunctivitis. Management Treatment. Removal of any and all possible allergens as well as conservative management such as cool compresses and lid scrubs make up the first line of therapy Giant papillary conjunctivitis. Sounds scary right? Many contact lens wearers actually suffer from this condition without even knowing it. But don't fret - giant papillary conjunctivitis, or GPC, is not some incurable, life-threatening disease. It is a type of allergic inflammation of the conjunctiva that is actually easily prevented and treated. What Causes Giant Papillary [

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis treatment Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis can be treated with the help of management at the various levels. In order to avoid such type of the issue, every individual should avoid having the contact lens for several weeks. The discomfort can be reduced to a considerable level by using cold compressions Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC), a severe form of contact-lens-induced conjunctivitis, is an inflammatory response to contact lens solutions, the contact lens material, protein deposits on the contact lenses, or mechanical trauma. Most likely, the mechanism is multifactorial in nature. Patients have a tendency to complain about red eyes.

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis: Stages, Treatment, and

The pharmacologic management of giant papillary conjunctivitis focuses on the reduction of histamine release from mast cells and inhibition of local inflammation. Topical corticosteroids, mast cell stabilizers, histamine receptor blockers, and vasoconstrictors have all been used alone or i Allergic conjunctivitis. Ectropion. Atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Giant papillary conjunctivitis. Superior limbic keratoconjunctivitis. Dermatochalasis. Management. Management should be carried out under medical supervision.Treatment is directed toward interrupting the eversion of the tarsus during sleep. Medical therapy: It consists o

Other allergic conjunctivitis, e.g. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC) (often contact lens-related) Toxic Keratoconjunctivitis. Management by the optometrist . Practitioners should recognise their limitations and where necessary seek further advice or refer the patient elsewhere . Non pharmacologica Bartlett JD, Howes JF, Ghormley NR, Amos JF, Laibovitz R, Horwitz B. Safety and efficacy of loteprednol etabonate for treatment of papillae in contact lens-associated giant papillary conjunctivitis. Curr Eye Res. 1993;12(4):313-21. PubMed Google Schola

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC) is the formation of small-sized nodules (called 'papillae', 0.3-1mm size or larger) on the inner side of the eyelids (on the conjunctiva); leading to foreign body sensation, persistent irritation, discharge of watery mucus, among other symptoms 21. Friedlaender MH, Howes J, The Loteprednol Etabonate Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Study Group I. A double-masked, placebo-controlled evaluation of the efficacy and safety of loteprednol etabonate in the treatment of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Am J Ophthalmol. 1997;123(4):455-464. 22 Management of Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis. Resolution of symptoms and restoration of functional use of contacts lenses or ocular prosthetics are the main goals of treatment for GPC. Although removal of the responsible foreign body is the definitive treatment, and that may be appropriate for exposed sutures or scleral buckles, complete. Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an inflammation initiated by microtrauma to the superior palpebral conjunctiva. It is associated with mechanical stimulation from either a contact lens, sutures or a prosthesis What Is Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC): Get the Facts. Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is also known as contact lens-induced papillary conjunctivitis (CLPC) because it is the most common symptom with people who wear contact lenses. GPC forms small nodules on the inner side of the eyelids as a result of foreign body irritation

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis - American Academy of

  1. It is characterized by enlarged papillae >0.3 mm, palpebral hyperemia and mucus secretion2, 3.If the size of papillae is greater than 1.0 mm, then it is called Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). It is an inflammatory condition commonly seen in soft contact lens wearers, patients with ocular prosthesis and patients with exposed sutures.
  2. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC) is an inflammatory reaction that occurs when proteins are secreted in your tears. They form a filmy coating on contact lenses that not only makes wearing them uncomfortable but also creates vision problems if not treated early on. In the initial phase of the condition, the inside of your eyelid may become.
  3. What causes conjunctivitis? Conjunctivitis may be caused by a virus, an allergic reaction (to dust, pollen, smoke, fumes or chemicals) or, in the case of giant papillary conjunctivitis, a foreign body on the eye, typically a contact lens. Other causes include exposure to infected persons and bacterial and viral infections elsewhere in the body
  4. We evaluated the efficacy of cromolyn sodium in the management of contact lens patients with GPC. Fourteen of 20 patients (70%) with moderate to severe giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) were able to continue wearing contact lenses with the use of 4% sodium cromolyn eye drops. These patients had.

How to Tackle a Giant - Review of Optometr

  1. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis The term 'conjunctivitis' refers to an inflammation of the membranes that line the eyelids and front of the eye. Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an inflammatory disorder that usually develops in contact lens wearers
  2. Clinical management and control of giant papillary conjunctivitis secondary to contact lens wear. Farkas P, Kassalow TW, Farkas B. J Am Optom Assoc, 57(3):197-200, 01 Mar 1986 Cited by: 2 articles | PMID: 395841
  3. mm, then it is termed Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). This condition is an inflammatory condition commonly seen in soft contact lens wearers, patients using ocula

Allergic conjunctivitis is a frequent condition as it is estimated to affect 20 percent of the population on an annual basis and approximately one-half of these people have a personal or family history of atopy. Giant papillary conjunctivitis accounts for 0.5-1.0% of eye disease in most countries. [citation needed] Reference Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a more severe form of contact allergic conjunctivitis. Symptoms of giant papillary conjunctivitis include those above, but a person may also experience: the. CONJUNCTIVITIS The conjunctiva is a thin membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelid and the white part of the eyeball (sclera). Inflammation of the conjunctiva is called conjunctivitis, which makes the white of the eye appear red. 3. Parts of Conjunctiva. 4 The person is suspected of having atopic keratoconjunctivitis, vernal keratoconjunctivitis or giant papillary conjunctivitis. If the person has suspected mild papillary conjunctivitis due to contact lens wear, assessment by an optometrist for modification of contact lens use is needed. Specialist management by an ophthalmologist is required for.

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Market Research Report present a detailed analysis of the market listing Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Market Size, Epidemiology, Drug therapies and pipeline for study period from 2017-2030 Giant papillary conjunctvitis (GPC) (also called contact lens related papillary conjunctvitis CLPC) In association with contact lens wear or as a result of conjunctvial exposure to foreign bodies. Papillary conjunctivitis is a nonspecific response to a noxious agent and can be a part of inflammatory reaction to any infectious organism, allergen, toxin, or trauma. Giant papillae (greater than 0.3 mm in diameter), however, are much more specific, and may be observed in vernal or giant papillary conjunctivitis (see below) Treatment of GPC Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Mild GPC Treatment GPC develops slowly over time so it is often possible for an astute eye doctor to find mild GPC before it becomes a clinically significant issue for the patient

Giant (mechanically induced) Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC), the severe form of mechanically induced papillary conjunctivitis, may be secondary to a variety of mechanical stimuli of the tarsal conjunctiva.Since GPC is predominantly associated with the use of contact lenses (CLs), the disease is also referred to as contact lens-induced papillary conjunctivitis (CLPC) Giant papillary conjunctivitis is an allergic reaction resulting in inflammation of the palpebral conjunctiva (thin membrane on the underside of the eyelids). Commonly called GPC by eye doctors, it is usually associated with contact lens wear or people with ocular prostheses (artificial eyes) or corneal sutures. GPC is one of the most common complications of wearing contact lenses Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis, or GPC as it is commonly known, is an inflammatory condition involving the conjunctiva of the human eye. The conjunctiva is the thin slippy tissue that covers the front of the eyes as well as the inside of the eyelid. The hallmark of this condition are small (and sometimes GIANT!) bumps called papillae that form. 4. Donshik P. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis. Trans of the Am Ophthalmol Soc 1994:92;687-744. 5. Donshik p, Porazinski A. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis in Frequent-Replacement Contact Lens Wearers: A Retrospective Study. Tr Am Ophth Soc 1999; 97:205-220. 6. Kruger CJ, Ehlers WH, et al. Treatment of Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis with Cromolyn. Giant papillary conjunctivitis shares certain clinical characteristics with vernal conj unctivitis. The diagnosis of GPC is suggested, however, by the presence of giant papillae in adult contact lens wearers (see section on Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis, p. 56 ff)

The chronic inflammatory condition we know as giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) predates contact lens wear, as ocular prostheses and exposed sutures have long been known to cause the condition through mechanical irritation of the ocular surfaces. 1 Constant use of soft or gas-permeable (GP) contact lenses can increase the incidence of it. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC) is an inflammatory response of the conjunctiva triggered by exposure to seasonal allergens. Treatment options for SAC include artificial tears, antihistamines, decongestants, mast cell stabilizers, nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, dual antihistamine/mast cell stabilizers, immunotherapy and corticosteroids To the Editor. —Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an inflammatory condition characterized by large papillary excrescences of the upper tarsal conjunctiva. 1 It has been associated with the wearing of soft and rigid contact lenses, which is often discontinued because of ocular discomfort. Recently, however, certain measures have been suggested that seem to restore contact lens tolerance Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an allergic reaction that causes small round bumps called papillae, to develop on the inner lining of the upper eyelid. In many cases, GPC is caused by seasonal allergies or eczema, though it can also occur when your eyelids become irritated from constantly rubbing over a foreign object in your eye, such. Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a type of allergic conjunctivitis caused by the chronic presence of a foreign body in the eye. People who wear hard or rigid contact lenses, wear soft contact lenses that are not replaced frequently, have an exposed suture on the surface of the eye or have a prosthetic eye are more likely to develop this form.

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Allergic Conjunctivitis - EyeWik

Giant papillary conjunctivitis, also known as GPC, is a condition of the.In the mild stage, reduced contact lens wearing time is the most common symptom. Stage 3 giant papillary conjunctivitis.A: Tarsal plate with markedinjection, thickening, and( obscurationi of normal vascuilar pattern. B: Papules are between 0.25 Medications and cosmetics may cause eye allergies. Allergic eye conditions include allergic conjunctivitis, conjunctivitis with atopic dermatitis, vernal keratoconjunctivitis, and giant papillary conjunctivitis. Dry eye, tear-duct obstruction, and conjunctivitis due to infection are frequently confused with eye allergies Giant papillary conjunctivitis. Giant papillary conjunctivitis is caused by: contact lenses; stitches used in eye surgery; a prostheses (artificial) part of the eye that's fitted during eye surgery; Giant papillary conjunctivitis is estimated to affect around 1-5% of people who use soft contact lenses and 1% of people who use hard contact lenses CLINICAL MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis Hay Fever from NUR HEALTH ASS at Aston Universit

Understanding Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (A Guide

Not long ago, clinicians saw the demise of contact lens-induced giant papillary conjunctivitis (CLPC) as a foregone conclusion. As most were aware, protein and perhaps other deposits that coated the lens surface gave rise to CLPC, so with the advent of disposable and daily disposable lens options, we thought the end was near for this condition (Takamura 2018; Baab et al., 2020) All of the four allergic conjunctivitis subtypes, except for giant papillary conjunctivitis, should start their management with topical lubricants, anti-histamines, and mast cell stabilizer drops. Giant papillary conjunctivitis necessitates the removal of the physical allergen, such as contact lenses, before.

Chronic Conjunctivitis, Part 1: Giant Papillary Conjunctiviti

Scleral Lenses for Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC) Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC) is an inflammatory reaction that occurs when proteins are secreted in your tears. They form a filmy coating on contact lenses that not only makes wearing them uncomfortable but also creates vision problems if not treated early on Differential diagnosis and management of acute follicular Conjunctivitis conjunctivitis BRIAN D. RANELLE, Fort Worth, Texas The differential diagnosis of acute follicular conjunctivitis is dependent upon the ability to differentiate follicular and papillary conjunctival responses. If this can be accomplished, the diagnostic possibilities are. Contact lenses can trigger giant papillary conjunctivitis but can also exacerbate other forms of allergic eye disease. Contact lens wearers with an acute red eye should be assessed by a trained optician or ophthalmologist and offered guidance regarding optimal care of their lenses. Avoid or reduce contact lens use until acute symptoms subside Giant papillary conjunctvitis (GPC) (also called contact lens related papillary conjunctvitis CLPC) In association with contact lens wear or as a result of conjunctvial exposure to foreign bodies.

Rethinking GPC: A New Look at an Old Proble

There is marked giant papillary proliferation of the upper tarsus which creates a distinctive cobblestone appearance. Fine papillae may be observable in the lower tarsus. The conjunctiva has a milky appearance. The eyes are usually chronically inflamed with a stingy mucous discharge. In a few cases, the lesions may spread onto the cornea Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an inflammatory reaction caused by proteins secreted in your tears. This inflammatory reaction causes lid glands to secrete substances that create a filmy coating on contact lenses, making them uncomfortable and creating vision problems Management Follow up Contact lens wear may lead to a keratoconjunctivitis or giant cell papillary conjunctivitis secondary to infrequent lens replacement, prolonged wearing time, poor lens hygiene, allergenic contact lens solutions, ionic nature or high water content, or poor fit of contact lenses.. Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis Another type of allergic conjunctivitis is directly related to contact lens wear. Giant papillary conjunctivitis occurs when the undersides of the eyelids become inflamed due to a reaction with contact lenses - usually soft lenses that are not disposed of daily

GPC: Don't Call it An Allergic Reactio

Giant papillary conjunctivitis — also has a mechanical component and can occur as a result of chronic micro-trauma (for example from contact lens wear, ocular prostheses or ocular sutures). In most cases (excluding vernal and atopic keratoconjunctivitis) conjunctivitis does not cause permanent visual loss or structural damage Allergies can affect contact lens wearers in three ways: environmental allergies causing increased lens problems, allergies to deposits on the lenses and sensitivities to care solutions. First, let's review the allergic response and causes of patient symptoms. Figure 1. Papillary conjunctivitis of the upper lid, often seen in allergies Giant papillary conjunctivitis GPC is an immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of superior tarsal conjunctiva. As the name implies, the primary finding is the presence of giant papillae, which are typically greater than 0.3 mm in diameter

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